A Jesuit, Filipino, and Asian Ecclesiastical Faculty of Theology

Friday, March 24, 2017
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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
(In alphabetical order of the Course Titles/Subtitles)
 
Advanced Group Process and Pastoral Counseling (Tutorial)
Fr. Arsenio Lumiqued, Jr., M.S.C., Ph.D.
 
This course guides students towards a further understanding of the dynamics and skills that are critical in leading group process and counseling. It trains them in strategies for designing group process and counseling for various types of groups, with careful attention given to specific concerns in various stages of development.
 
Apprenticeship for Ministry I 
TBA
 
This initial apprenticeship course for Doctor of Ministry students is administered by an expert and includes 40 hours of practicum in a more specific area of (a) Religious Education (textbook writing, designing catechetical programs, actual teaching, catechists’ training, etc.), (b) Spirituality and Retreat Direction (spiritual direction, retreat-giving, lectures, etc.) or (c) Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Care (actual counseling hours, preparation of programs, etc.).
 
Apprenticeship for Ministry II 
TBA
 
This follow-up apprenticeship course for Doctor of Ministry students is administered by an expert and includes 40 hours of practicum in a more specific area of (a) Religious Education (textbook writing, designing catechetical programs, actual teaching, catechists’ training, etc.), (b) Spirituality and Retreat Direction (spiritual direction, retreat-giving, lectures, etc.) or (c) Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Care (actual counseling hours, preparation of programs, etc.).
 
Baptism, Confirmation, Penance, Anointing 
Fr. Paul Dass, S.J., S.L.L. (A), Fr. Genaro Diwa, S.L.L. (B)
 
This course studies the history, theology, liturgy and spirituality of the Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Penance and Anointing of the Sick.
 
Basic Concepts in Psycho-Sexual Formation 
Dr. Ingeborg del Rosario, D.Min.
 
This course is designed to tackle basic concepts and issues essential in moving towards psycho-sexual maturity. The topics discussed are aimed to inform, engage and challenge the participants in their understanding of psycho-sexual formation in the context of consecrated life and ministry. A vital part of the formators’ work is also going through their own process of integration. The workshop will thus provide opportunities for reflection and processing about their own psychosexual growth. Participants will have ample chance to deepen the course input through individual consultations, sharing and group processes. Topics in this course include: Notions of Sexuality, Physical and Psychosexual Development, Development of Sexual Identity, Problematic Sexuality: Wounding and Healing, Affective Sexuality, Intimacy and Chaste/Celibate Sexuality.
 
Basics in the Renewal of Religious Education 
Ma. Lucia Natividad, Ph.D.
 
This course begins with a study and evaluation of the methods in formative dimensions of the new approaches to the worship dimension of Catholic Faith.  It then focuses on an in depth study of the liturgical renewal, the Sacramentality of the ritual sacraments, and spirituality, from the theological educator’s “Practical Theology’s” perspective.
 
Biblical Greek II 
Fr. Renato Repole, S.J., S.T.D.
 
This course is a continuation of Greek I where the rest of the basic grammatical principles will be tackled. At the end of the course, the students will hopefully be acquainted with more verb tenses, the participles, third declension, the mi-verbs, etc. As usual, reading and parsing exercises on excerpts from the New Testament will be the primary means to aid retention and mastery. Vocabulary building will also be another major aim.
 
Minimum number of students: 6
 
Biblical Greek IV 
Fr. Herbert Schneider, S.J., S.T.D.
 
This course is a continuation of Biblical Greek III.
 
Biblical Hebrew II 
Fr. Felipe Fruto Ramirez, S.J., S.T.D.
 
This course consists in the translation and cursive reading of selections from the narrative texts of the Hebrew Bible. It will also include discussions of topics on advanced grammar and syntax using Waltke-O’Connor’s An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax. Students should now begin to invest in books needed for their future study of the Old Testament, among which are Hebrew Bible and a Hebrew dictionary.
 
Prerequisite: Biblical Hebrew I
 
Biblical Hebrew IV 
Fr. Felipe Fruto Ramirez, S.J., S.T.D.
 
This course consists in the translation and cursive reading of selections from the poetic texts of the Hebrew Bible – psalms, proverbs, and prophetic oracles – as well as selections from late Biblical Hebrew texts of Job and Qoheleth. It will also include discussions of topics on advanced grammar and syntax using Waltke-O’Connor’s An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax.
 
Prerequisite: Biblical Hebrew I, II and III
 
Canon Law II 
Fr. Reginaldo Mananzan, S.J., J.C.D.
 
The course continues Canon Law I and focuses on the canonical-pastoral dimension of the sacraments – including recent legislation of the Church regarding marriage. It examines the significant canons of the following Books of the 1983 Code of Canon Law: the Sanctifying Office of the Church, the Temporal Goods of the Church, Sanctions in the Church, and Processes.
 
Christian Sanctity: Integration of Dogma, Spirituality and Life 
(Henri Nouwen: A Spirituality of Integration and Imperfection) 
Wil Hernandez, Obl. O.S.B., Ph.D.
 
This course is about the spirituality of Henri Nouwen set against the background theme of spiritual journey. The main focus will be threefold: Nouwen’s integrated journey, his tensional and imperfect spirituality, and his integrated ministry.
First, the course provides a synthesis of Nouwen’s holistic approach to the nature of the inward, outward, and upward spiritual journey—one that integrates spirituality, psychology, ministry, and theology together in a seamless fashion. Second, it is an exploration of Nouwen’s spirituality of imperfection which he embodied throughout his lived experience—where the journey toward perfection is through the realities of tension and imperfection. Finally, it is an overview of Nouwen’s well-integrated ministry of soul care based upon his integrated yet imperfect spirituality.
 
Church and Mission 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
Pastoral leadership must never be an end in itself but is always directed towards the Church’s mission.  This course helps participants gain a renewed understanding of the mission of Christ in bringing about God’s kingdom of love, and how this mission continues in the Church today especially in the context of their own countries.  The social teachings and social mission of the Church are given a renewed emphasis, particularly through the teachings of Pope Francis on evangelization, justice and ecology. Participants bring these teachings into dialogue with concrete signs of the times through tools for social analysis, including the pastoral cycle.  
 
Church and Sacraments 
Fr. Arnel Aquino, S.J., S.T.D., and Fr. James Kroeger, M.M., D.Miss.
 
The course examines the foundations, historical developments, nature, and mission of the Church. It presents the major themes of Vatican II’s ecclesiology, situating them in the council’s historical context. It considers such questions as: the interrelationship between the Church and the Kingdom of God, interreligious dialogue, ecumenism, evangelization and mission, inculturation, basic ecclesial communities, as well as Mary’s place in the Mystery of the Church. The course also introduces students to the liturgical and sacramental life of the Church. Beginning with the experience of worship and ritual in life, it considers the nature and scope of liturgy in general and the sacraments in particular. Key principles of sacramental theology are explained with a view to the further study of the individual sacraments.
 
Conflict and Parish Management Consulting 
Fr. Jojo Fung, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course helps participants understand the task of management and approach it from a Christian faith perspective.  It facilitates a close examination of management by the People of God through the lens of Scripture and the teachings of the Church, drawing lessons for how pastoral workers can approach their management responsibilities today as cooperators with God.  Based on this foundation, practical skills for communal discernment, developing common vision, implementing action plans, improving institutional structures, office administration, networking and use of modern technology are shared.  The course also deals with the key topic of working with people as collaborators in the mission of Christ, including personnel development, communication, building teams and handling conflicts.  Participants are helped to adapt these skills to their specific organizational settings such as parishes, schools, dioceses, religious communities, formation institutes, social centers and other ministries.
 
Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism 
Umberto Bresciani, Ph.D., Fr. Sergio Targa, S.X., M.Phil., Fr. Tiziano Tosolini, S.X., Ph.D.
 
The course aims to acquaint the students with the main traits of some Asian Religions (Buddhism, Hinduism and Confucianism) and to analyze the philosophies which stemmed from them. Emphasis will also be placed on how the knowledge of these religious worldviews and philosophical systems could contribute to the much-needed activity of inter-cultural and interreligious dialogue.
 
Creation and Eschatology 
Fr. Arnel Aquino, S.J., S.T.D. (A)
 
This course is fundamentally a course in theological anthropology – the study of humanity. The concern of this course lies with the anthropological question of how God deals concretely with human beings who are in the world, and how Christianity understands eternal life as the promise God has given to us through the Son, and the sanctification and guidance of the Holy Spirit. The course also explores what implications this future promise has on human life here and now. In this quest, we will be guided by questions in the collective memory of the Church, the Christian tradition, the theory of evolution, the concern for ecology, to name a few. The course will explore the Christian understanding of what it is to be human beings “in the world, but not of the world”.
 
Creation and Eschatology 
Fr. Jose Mario Francisco, S.J., S.T.L., Ph.D. (B)
This course locates the Christian view on the origin and destiny of the world and humankind within the contemporary dialogue involving science, religion and culture. Classic Christian themes (God’s creation of nature and humans in relation to each other, the meaning of matter/body and spirit/soul, and traditional eschatology in terms of heaven, hell and purgatory) are studied in their historical contexts as well as critically interrogated by insights from material and cognitive sciences. This interaction draws out the ecological, moral and spiritual implications for Christian praxis, and enriches our understanding of God’s action in partnership with humans and nature from creation through history to absolute fulfillment.
 
Discovering Vatican II Through Film 
Fr. James Kroeger, M.M., D.Miss.
 
The Second Vatican Council is the most important event in the modern era of the Roman Catholic Church.  Opened by Pope John XXIII in October 1962 and closed by Pope Paul VI in December 1965, the Council produced sixteen written documents including four major constitutions.
 
This survey course will study the history, ideas, persons and documents of the Council as well as the subsequent impact of Vatican II on the Church and her evangelizing mission.  Films and video documentaries as well as selected readings provide the course content.  Included in the variety of films to be viewed are the following: Vatican II: Civilization of Love (9-part series); The Faithful Revolution: Vatican II (10-part series); I Will Be Called John (Life of John XXIII); John Paul II: The Millennial Pope; Author of Reform: The Cardinal Suenens Story; Bernadin; A Woman’s View of Vatican II and the Modern Church (Sr. Mary Tobin, SL); John Courtney Murray.
 
The methodology of the course will employ a weekly film or documentary viewing, class readings and discussion, as well as additional theological-missiological input by the professor.  Film reviews and relevant readings will be distributed. Students will be required to submit short reflection and synthesis papers.
 
Ecclesiology and Ministries in Migration Context 
Emmanuel de Guzman, Ph.D.
 
The course deals with the following concerns: What opportunities and challenges does contemporary global mobility offer to the human community where people of plural and diverse social locations are struggling for their identity, dignity, respect and acceptance? How have the Christian Churches been responding to the plight of the migrants in terms of its teachings and actual practices? What enriched ecclesiological vision and ministries of intercultural unity, catholicity, holiness and apostolicity can come about in a world with great social, economic, political, cultural, and religious divides? What kind of pastoral agents or missionaries are needed in the context of migration? Recommended primary textbook: Agnes M. Brazal and Emmanuel S. de Guzman, Intercultural Church: Bridge of Solidarity in the Migration Context (Borderless Press, 2015; available on Amazon by print-on-demand and Kindle version).
 
Ecclesiology 
Fr. Ronald Bagley, C.J.M. (A)
 
This course explores the nature of the Church. The first part of the course will focus on the Church in Scripture, followed by a brief historical overview, highlighting the understanding of the Church given at Vatican II as well developments in ecclesiology. Attention will be given to the biblical foundations of the Church, especially its relationship to the Reign (Kingdom) of God. The key biblical images identified by Vatican II (Sacrament of Salvation, Mystery, People of God, Body of Christ, Temple of the Holy Spirit) will be examined and evaluated for their relevance. The reception of the ecclesiology of Vatican II in the intervening 50 years will be discussed. The nature of the Church’s ongoing mission of evangelization will be highlighted. Key ecclesiological elements for an Asian and Filipino Church will be gleaned from selected FABC documents, PCP II, and Ecclesia in Asia.
 
Ecclesiology 
Fr. James Kroeger, M.M., D.Miss. (B)
 
This course presents a comprehensive theology of the Church (origin, nature, mission, and destiny); in brief, it treats the combined areas of fundamental and systematic ecclesiology. Central themes of the course include: the Church vis-à-vis the Kingdom of God; Vatican II’s texts, shifts, and Trinitarian ecclesiology of communion; the Church as Mystery, Pilgrim People of God, Body of Christ, Sacrament of Salvation, Temple of the Spirit; local Church and an ecclesiology of communion; the Church’s complex mission of integral evangelization; the holiness of the Church and spirituality; Mary in the Mystery of the Church. Some ecclesiological insights of the FABC, the Second Plenary Council of The Philippines, Ecclesia in Asia, and the 2006 Asian Mission Congress will round out the course.
 
Ecclesiology 
Bro. Joaquin Yap, Jr., S.W., D.Phil. (C)
 
The Church as a topic worthy of dogmatic assertions is closely bound up with its nature as mystery, “a reality imbued with the hidden presence of God,” in the apt words of Paul VI.  If we believe (as we do and should) that the Church is not simply a human reality but also a divine one; if we believe that the Church is Christ’s body inseparable from the head as to form “one Christ” and totus Christus; if the Church is not only “the community of those who are saved” but also “the community through which one is saved,” then we can begin to understand why it is important to study the Church.
 
This course attempts a systematic study of the “people of God, body of Christ, and temple of the Spirit” as taught in Scripture and elaborated in Church teaching.  It will present the major themes of Vatican II’s ecclesiology, situating them in the council’s historical context and giving more emphasis to “communion ecclesiology” which, according to the Extraordinary Synod of 1985, is crucial to a proper understanding of Vatican II’s teaching on the Church.  The course will also consider such questions as: the interrelationship between the Church and the Kingdom of God, between the Church and other religions; ecumenism, evangelization and mission, renewal and reform, and Mary as the most illustrious member of the Church.
 
Essentials of Parish Leadership 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
The course begins with an examination of leadership within the Christian faith tradition and its evolution in secular scholarship. It encourages a reflection on the principles, attitudes and behaviours of leadership consonant with a pastoral approach.  Through personal stories, group discussions, self-evaluation tools and creative exercises, participants examine their own conceptions of leadership as well as their past experiences of leading and following in various contexts.  The importance of self-awareness is emphasized, along with practical ways of managing oneself especially in relations with others.  The course also discusses issues of authority and power, and helps participants identify and channel their own sources of power in a positive and life-giving way. To personally integrate these challenges, participants learn how to take action and, with the help of others, develop a supportive environment for personal transformation and conversion.
 
Ethics in Pastoral Care and Ministry 
Fr. Ronald Bagley, C.J.M.
 
Pastoral ministry and spiritual care in the Church involve the formation of special fiduciary relationships which are developed in a variety of settings such as counseling, spiritual or retreat direction, religious formation or even in religious education. This
course presents basic elements of ethics which serve as the foundation of professional ethics in ministry. By analyzing how these elements are codified in professional codes of conduct and competencies within the specific fields of ministry, this course endeavors to assist students in personalizing these ethical guidelines towards a greater sense of integrity of ministry in the Church.
 
Explorations in Individual and Family Resilience 
Fr. Teodulo Gonzales, S.J.
 
Adversities (trial, sufferings) have a way of crippling or paralyzing people’s responses.  On the other hand, like some crises, adversities can break or allow us to have a breakthrough.  This course draws from the strengths, hopes and the stirrings of the Spirit within all of us.  Drawn from various sources, some stories of healing and resilience will be explored.  A theory of change why people are motivated to bounce back from adversities will be presented.  Some helping or facilitating skills (STAR Model) for resilience will be presented in some of the classes.
 
Expository Writing and Research Methods II 
Rose Marie Regalia, M.B.A. (A) 
Josephine Nolasco, M.A. (B)
 
This course is devoted to refining skills in writing papers to equip the students with the necessary tools in writing academic papers, particularly argumentative papers. The course is organized into two parts: review of learned skills from Expository Writing and Research I and the process of Argumentative Research Writing. In order to reinforce and establish the necessary foundations involved in writing, the students are exposed to exercises and academic discussions of the concepts taken in the previous course, particularly sentence patterns and paragraphing.
 
Faith, Reason, and Science (Tutorial)
Markus Locker, Ph.D.
 
This course deals with the different ways relations between contemporary science and religion have been construed. While historical examples such as the Galileo controversy will be discussed, the main focus will below the methods and results of contemporary science invite Christian to rethink and enrich their understanding of doctrines regarding divine action in the world and the nature of the soul.
 
Family Spirituality and Sexual Ethics 
Fr. James Gascon, S.J., M.A. and Fr. Juvenal Moraleda, C.Ss.R., M.A., S.T.L.
 
This course treats the theology of Christian marriage and family in its scriptural-doctrinal underpinnings, including the socio-political role of the family in today’s world, in the light of the social teachings of the Church. It then deals with an integrative, psycho-moral approach to marital sexuality, and how marital sex issues are handled in pastoral care and counseling. Toward the integration of sensuality, sexuality and spirituality.
 
Family Spirituality Practicum 
Myrna Joyce Sanchez, Ph.D. and Ma. Elvira Macabuag, M.A.
 
The course offers a total program in family spirituality, designed to help couples and families to be fully alive in all levels of their relationship: intrapersonal, interpersonal and metapersonal (societal).  This holistic approach integrates the psycho-emotional, cultural, socio-political and spiritual aspects of family life. The course includes an actual experience of progressive programs: the Marriage Encounter, the Spiritual Deepening Retreat, the Christian Parenting for Peace and Justice, and their counterpart programs for the poor and underprivileged sectors of our society. Aside from the regular class, students are required to attend the following weekend seminars (contact CEFAM for the dates): Marriage Encounter, Spiritual Deepening Retreat, Christian Parenting for Peace and Justice.
 
Formative Processing Skills 
Dr. Ingeborg del Rosario, D.Min.
 
“Formative processing” is a means of deepened reflection wherein an individual in the context of formation is helped to arrive at an expanded perspective, greater understanding, acceptance and owning of a significant personal experience. This is a skills-training course divided into two parts. Part 1 will offer inputs to teach and refine various skills pertinent to effective formative processing. Part 2 will give participants the opportunity to practice and have their processing skills critiqued and assessed.
 
Foundations for Directed Retreat 
Fr. Victor Baltazar, S.J., S.T.L.
 
Foundational to the ministry of retreat-giving and spiritual direction is a deep experience of God’s love and the experience of accompaniment that helps one to notice, relish and respond to God’s person and action in oneself and one’s world. Hence, every applicant to our Directors’ formation modules are required to go through an individually-directed retreat preferably guided by a CIS-formed director.
 
Course requirements: reflection papers, book reports, and others, to be assigned at the discretion of the Director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality.
 
Fundamentals of Directed Retreat-Giving 
Fr. Victor Baltazar, S.J., S.T.L.
 
This second module of the Formation Course formally introduces participants to the ministry of retreat-giving and spiritual direction as a ministry practiced with the intent of animating individuals, communities or even whole institutions. The participants are guided through conferences, case studies, real case spiritual direction demonstrations and workshops aimed at providing basic knowledge, skills and dispositions on spiritual direction and retreat-giving whether in individually-directed retreat formats or conference retreat formats. Module 2 of the Summer Formation course is also offered on a staggered basis as the Study Circle on Spiritual Direction and Ignatian Retreat-Giving.
 
Pre-requisite: Foundations for Directed Retreat. Course requirements: reflection papers, book reports, and others, to be assigned at the discretion of the Director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality.
 
Giving the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius 
Fr. Victor Baltazar, S.J., S.T.L.
 
Module 4 provides an opportunity for participants to acquire a working knowledge of the specific parts and texts of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. The course is designed to equip the participants with adequate knowledge and skills in order to give the Spiritual Exercises in daily life. The process seeks to guide participants through conferences, reflective reading, personal and common prayer, faith sharing and spiritual direction, whether one-on-one or in groups.
 
Prerequisites: Theo 282.1/394.1 (Foundations for Directed Retreat), Theo 282.2/394.2 (Fundamentals of Directed Retreat-Giving) and Theo 282.3/394.3 (Supervised Retreat-Giving Experience).
Course requirements: reflection papers, book reports, and others, to be assigned at the discretion of the Director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality.
 
Growing in Religious Vows 
Dr. Ingeborg del Rosario, D.Min.
 
This course is designed to enable formators to become more effective in accompanying others to live and grow in the vowed life both in early and continuing formation. The dynamics of living poverty, chastity and obedience will be discussed vis-a-vis the psychological dynamics that these entail.  Related issues in sexuality, power, authority, stewardship, and possession will be tackled in the light of the vows.
 
History of Spirituality: Solitude and Desert Experience 
Fr. Eduardo Africa, O.S.B., S.T.D.
 
Desert spirituality is a technical term that has biblical and early Christian roots. It is a staple of all Christian spirituality. This desert experience was developed into a coherent spirituality by the desert fathers and mothers in the 3rd and 4th centuries of the Christian era. A special appeal to heroic souls was the belief that the demons infested the wastelands and could be met there in open combat. It did not take long for the desert dweller to discover that the demons were within and to be engaged in the battleground of the soul. The course will include the basic reading of the St. Athanasius’ Vita Antonii, which is one of the foremost classics of Christian spirituality. The overall principle that must be returned to is: the call to emptiness and encounter with God.  Charles Cummings explains this in his book, Spirituality and the Desert Experience: Studies in Formative Spirituality, which will also be discussed.
 
For Christians today, the desert is a graphic symbol of the emptiness of life and the otherness of God. The emptiness translated into purity of heart, a heart freed from sinful affections and centered on God. Thus, the beatitude that best sums up desert spirituality is “Blessed are the pure of heart, for they shall see God”.
 
History of the Church in Asia 
Fr. Antonio de Castro, S.J., S.T.L., E.H.D. (A), Fernando Guillen-Preckler, Sch.P., S.T.D. (B)
 
Against the background of universal Church history and the successive paradigms of Roman Primacy, and coming from a missionary perspective, the course intends to present a historical survey of the principal periods and forms of Christianity in Asia, from the Apostolic and Patristic times (the Asian Patriarchates) to the centuries of the great Asian Empires (Arabic and Mongol) and the arrival of the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, English, and French in Asia. Special attention will be given to the present situation of local Church in Asia since World War II and Vatican Council II, and the rise of Asian Theology. International students may take this course as substitute for Theo 275, Philippine Church History.
 
Human Rights of Migrants 
Fr. Graziano Battistella, C.S., Ph.D.
 
The first part of the course examines the origin and development of human rights; it discusses its ethical foundation and examines some controversial aspects in the human rights discourse; it then examines the theological foundation of human rights and the relation between human rights and the rights of the poor. The second part focuses on the specific rights of migrants and refugees, recognized in international instruments such as the humanitarian instruments of the United Nations, the Geneva Convention on the rights of refugees, the ILO conventions on the rights of migrants, and in particular the Migrant Workers Convention. The course ends with the analysis of the rights of Filipino migrants as contained in RA 8042 and in RA 10022.
 
Introduction to Pastoral Methods 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course takes a closer look at leadership in the context of the Catholic Church, especially in the light of Vatican II. By examining the event, the teachings and the “spirit” of the Council, it discusses new understandings of leadership emerging since Vatican II. Just as important is the cultural context of leadership. The teachings of the universal Church are brought into dialogue with one’s own culture.  This course also helps participants cultivate a habit of critical reflection and identify paradigms of leadership that are culturally-conditioned. Attitudes and skills for greater cultural intelligence and sensitivity are also imparted.  
 
Introduction to the New Testament 
Fr. Manuel Montesclaros, S.J., S.S.L.
 
This course provides an introduction to the Jewish-Graeco-Roman world of the first century C.E. and to the methods and approaches used in the study of the New Testament. It gives a brief overview of the contents of the books of the New Testament.
 
John
Sr. Ma. Anicia Co, R.V.M., S.T.D., Ph.D. (A)
 
The course introduces the students to the theological themes of the Gospel of John, the Johannine letters, and the Book of Revelation. It offers a perspective for understanding the Johannine writings by considering their historical and conceptual background as well as the relationship of the Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics. It discusses the content, message, language and style of the Johannine writings and includes exegesis of selected passages. An aesthetic and narrative critical reading is employed to highlight the overall message communicated through symbolic language. It explores other methods and approaches to bring to light the relevance of the Johannine writings to contemporary times.
 
John 
Sr. Niceta Vargas, O.S.A., Ph.D. (B)
 
This course focuses on major trends in Johannine research in the past years. Students in this course will present an exegesis of Johannine passages with the use of varied biblical methodologies of interpretation.
 
John 
Fr. Herbert Schneider, S.J., S.T.D. (C, Online)
 
This course introduces the student to the Gospel of John through a study of necessary background, overview study, and exegetical work with chosen passages. At the end of the course, the student should be able to demonstrate the following: an understanding of the literary and theological characteristics of the Fourth Gospel; an awareness of the historical, religious and social issues confronting the Johannine community; an ability to analyze the text using various methods of exegesis; an in-depth understanding of selected texts; and an understanding of specific Johannine topics, e.g., faith, world, Christ, and discipleship among others.
 
Karol Wojtyla’s ‘Love and Responsibility’ 
Fr. Renan Michael La Guardia, S.D.B., Ph.D.
 
Even before he assumed the papacy, Karol Wojtyla had already produced a remarkably eloquent and cogent defense of Catholic tradition in the sphere of family life and sexual morality. His major work, Love and Responsibility (1960), drawn from his own pastoral experiences as a priest and bishop, and based on his Christian Personalism, contains his philosophico-theological persuasions on the sexual self-realization of the human person.
 
This course is a systematic attempt at an understanding and appreciation of the mind of the Personalist philosopher who became Pope John Paul II. It will explore his life and times, especially mindful of the significant influences that shaped his thinking, examine in depth his aforementioned opus as the result of what he calls “an incessant confrontation of doctrine with life,” and enable the students to engage in meaningful discussions on the moral issues which Wojtyla addressed and which have remained controversial even in our time.
 
Latin II 
Fr. Reginaldo Mananzan, S.J., J.C.D.
This course is open for those who already have the equivalent knowledge of Latin I. It begins with studies of verbs in their subjunctive mood and proceeds with the rest of the verb structures. The main goal of the course is the basic recognition of the forms and meanings of Latin words to allow students to have facility in making private translations with the help of a Latin grammar and dictionary. Current Latin ecclesiastical texts will also be used during the course aside from the classical ones.
 
Prerequisite: Latin I
 
Leadership Ethics for Pastoral Care 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course provides an important grounding for pastoral leaders in the Church’s teachings on morals, ethics and virtues.  Through a combination of theoretical knowledge, case studies and reflection on practical experiences, the course helps participants deepen their appreciation of the rich ethical wisdom that the Catholic faith tradition has to offer, and its application in various contemporary leadership situations.  This will be complemented by an equally important focus on spirituality, through facilitated workshops on Christian prayer, growing in relationship with God, developing habits of contemplation and reflection, and deepening in personal authenticity and leadership spirituality. The sessions help participants grow in faith and moral maturity, whatever their stage of life, and are complemented by retreats, prayer and worship at EAPI, personal accompaniment and spiritual direction made available for all.
 
Leadership for Mission 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
Pastoral leadership must never be an end in itself but is always directed towards the Church’s mission.  This course helps participants gain a renewed understanding of the mission of Christ in bringing about God’s kingdom of love, and how this mission continues in the Church today especially in the context of their own countries.  The social teachings and social mission of the Church are given a renewed emphasis, particularly through the teachings of Pope Francis on evangelization, justice and ecology. Participants bring these teachings into dialogue with concrete signs of the times through tools for social analysis, including the pastoral cycle.  
 
Leadership in Context 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course takes a closer look at leadership in the context of the Catholic Church, especially in the light of Vatican II. By examining the event, the teachings and the “spirit” of the Council, it discusses new understandings of leadership emerging since Vatican II. Just as important is the cultural context of leadership. The teachings of the universal Church are brought into dialogue with one’s own culture.  This course also helps participants cultivate a habit of critical reflection and identify paradigms of leadership that are culturally-conditioned. Attitudes and skills for greater cultural intelligence and sensitivity are also imparted.  
 
Leadership: A Pastoral Approach 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
The course begins with an examination of leadership within the Christian faith tradition and its evolution in secular scholarship. It encourages a reflection on the principles, attitudes and behaviours of leadership consonant with a pastoral approach.  Through personal stories, group discussions, self-evaluation tools and creative exercises, participants examine their own conceptions of leadership as well as their past experiences of leading and following in various contexts.  The importance of self-awareness is emphasized, along with practical ways of managing oneself especially in relations with others.  The course also discusses issues of authority and power, and helps participants identify and channel their own sources of power in a positive and life-giving way. To personally integrate these challenges, participants learn how to take action and, with the help of others, develop a supportive environment for personal transformation and conversion.
 
MA Comprehensive Exam Review
Fr. Arnel Aquino, S.J., S.T.D.
 
In order to assist MA students in reviewing the courses and in preparing for Part I of the MA Comprehensive Exam, LST provides review classes in every 1st and 3rd quarters of the academic year; correspondingly, oral exams are held in the 2nd and 4th quarters. Review classes consist of seven (7) sessions of three (3) hours each.  This is equivalent to half a semester of classes. There is an introductory session for an overview of the theses; five sessions for the five courses; and a final integration or synthesis class. The thesis statements cover the following Foundation Subjects: Revelation-Faith, Christian Worship, Christology, Ecclesiology and Fundamental Moral Theology.
 
Management Skills for Pastoral Leaders 
Fr. Jojo Fung, S.J., Ph.D.
 
Based on the pastoral approach to management, this course covers practical tools and competencies in management such as pastoral planning, change management, project management, budgeting, risk management, stewardship, finance basics for leaders, and fund-raising, including project proposal writing. The course takes the form of hands-on workshops where participants are encouraged to apply the tools to actual projects that they have been doing or intend to undertake.  The exercises include both individual and group work.
 
Management: A Pastoral Approach 
Fr. Jojo Fung, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course helps participants understand the task of management and approach it from a Christian faith perspective.  It facilitates a close examination of management by the People of God through the lens of Scripture and the teachings of the Church, drawing lessons for how pastoral workers can approach their management responsibilities today as cooperators with God.  Based on this foundation, practical skills for communal discernment, developing common vision, implementing action plans, improving institutional structures, office administration, networking and use of modern technology are shared.  The course also deals with the key topic of working with people as collaborators in the mission of Christ, including personnel development, communication, building teams and handling conflicts.  Participants are helped to adapt these skills to their specific organizational settings such as parishes, schools, dioceses, religious communities, formation institutes, social centers and other ministries.
 
Mariology 
Msgr. Sabino Vengco, S.T.D.
 
The course is a theological reflection on the mystery of Mary, the mother of the Redeemer, within the context of salvation history and the Church. It treats the scriptural roots of the Church’s teachings on Mary, patristic developments and dogmatic expressions in Christian tradition, certain ecumenical and feminist perspectives in the contemporary modern world, and particular manifestations of Marian devotion in the local churches of Asia.
 
Marital/Family Counseling Practicum 
Fr. Arsenio Lumiqued, Jr., M.S.C., Ph.D. (A)
Leilani Lopez, M.A. (B)
Myrna Joyce Sanchez, Ph.D. (C)
 
The course features a practicum in pastoral counseling with clients experiencing problems in their couple and/or family relationships. Students conduct a required number of hours of face-to-face counseling with such clients under the supervision of the professor who will assist them in case conceptualization and planning and in treatment implementation. Case conferences, role-play case simulations, and demonstration films augment students’ development as effective pastoral couple and family counselors.
 
Required counseling hours:  30 hours
Prerequisites: Theo 292.3/Sp92.3 Assessment and Initial Interventions of Individual and Relationship Disorders; Theo 289/Sp89 Pastoral Psychology and Counseling; Theo 293/Sp93   Marital/Premarital Dynamics and Counseling: A Psycho-Spiritual Approach; Theo 293.1/Sp93.1 Family Dynamics and Counseling Approaches
 
Medical/Sexual Ethics 
Fr. Eric Marcelo Genilo, S.J., S.T.D. (A)
Fr. Romeo Intengan, S.J., M.D., S.T.L. (B)
 
The course builds on the students’ knowledge of fundamental moral theology and introduces the students to Catholic approaches, principles, and moral norms related to sexual ethics and bioethics. The course will be divided into two parts. The first part will take up sexual ethics while the second part will take up bioethics. For each part of the course, a discussion of basic approaches, methods, and specific church teachings will be followed by case applications. The course aims to develop the students’ skills in addressing pastoral and moral cases involving sexual ethics and bioethics.
 
Prerequisite: Fundamental Moral Theology
 
Methods and Materials of Research: Academic Style Module
Fr. Peter Pojol, S.J., S.T.D.
 
The Academic Style Module includes training in the Turabian style applied to theological writing, the correct method in using data from sources, guidelines to avoid plagiarism, use of software, and other exercises to train students writing theological research papers. It is different from the LST Propaedeutic English course (Expository Writing and Research) which trains the students in grammar and basic expository writing.
 
Methods and Materials of Research: Research Techniques for Theological Libraries
Fr. James Kroeger, M.M., D.Miss.
 
This practicum is designed to assist students in maximizing the use of a theological library, such as that of Loyola School of Theology. It emerges from the practical, concrete need of students to effectively discover and use theological sources for writing research/synthesis papers, particularly theses and dissertations. Often, important resources are missed and considerable time is wasted, because students are unaware of the library’s resources and they do not know how to systematically do research in a theological library.
 
This ten-hour “hands-on” practicum or workshop is offered periodically throughout the semester; no credit is given; however, a modest registration fee is asked. Individual professors may prescribe this practicum as a pre-requisite to doing a major paper or writing a thesis. Students who take this workshop should have been enrolled at LST for at least one semester.
 
The entire practicum will be offered on one weekend: Friday (1:00 – 4:45 pm); Saturday (8:00 am – 12:00 nn and 1:00 pm – 4:45 pm). Each weekend session is limited to 15 students.
 
Ministry of the Word II 
Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, D.D., Fr. Emmanuel Alfonso, S.J., M.A., cand., and Jesuit Communications
 
This Jesuit Communications Foundation seminar-workshop endeavors to equip students with necessary skills in effectively carrying out the Ministry of the Word in its various traditional and contemporary forms. The course includes modules on faith and media, public speaking and communication skills, presentation techniques, handling the media, hosting and interviewing skills, the practice and spirituality of preaching, homiletics, story-telling, etc.
 
Mysticism and St. Ignatius 
Fr. Stefano Kim Young-hoon, S.J., S.T.D.
 
This course aims at a deeper understanding of mysticism in relation to Christian spirituality as the academic discipline that articulates the lived experience of spiritual life. The syllabus includes an overview of the definition of mysticism, its methodology, and some perspectives reflecting from the history of spirituality. This class also presents an opportunity for participants to develop a more adequate understanding of the mysticism in relation to Ignatian Spirituality. Students will be exposed to the life of Ignatius of Loyola and his various texts. Each class session will be followed by small group discussion on the readings and writing assignment for the week. This course will culminate in a research paper.
 
Overview of Moral Theology 
Fr. Abundio R. Babor, Jr., M.S.C., S.T.D.
 
This is a synthetic course on Christian morality that offers an overview of fundamental morality, sexual ethics, bio-ethics and social justice. It presents the historical richness and diversity of the Church’s moral tradition, seeking to provide the students with an awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the sources of the moral tradition. Through the use of cases, the course will illustrate methods of moral analysis and the application of moral principles.
 
Parish Leadership Spirituality 
Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course provides an important grounding for pastoral leaders in the Church’s teachings on morals, ethics and virtues.  Through a combination of theoretical knowledge, case studies and reflection on practical experiences, the course helps participants deepen their appreciation of the rich ethical wisdom that the Catholic faith tradition has to offer, and its application in various contemporary leadership situations.  This will be complemented by an equally important focus on spirituality, through facilitated workshops on Christian prayer, growing in relationship with God, developing habits of contemplation and reflection, and deepening in personal authenticity and leadership spirituality. The sessions help participants grow in faith and moral maturity, whatever their stage of life, and are complemented by retreats, prayer and worship at EAPI, personal accompaniment and spiritual direction made available for all.
 
Pastoral Counseling Practicum 
Ms. Leilani Lopez, M.A.
 
The course is a continuation of Pastoral Psychology and Counseling (Theo 289/Sp 89) focusing on skills development.  As a practicum course, it will include case presentations and group supervision aimed at developing competency in working with individuals.  Each student is expected to work with counselees for the duration of the course.
 
Pre-requisite: Theo 289/Sp89 Pastoral Psychology and Counseling.
Minimum number of students:  10
 
Paul (New Testament Letters) 
Sr. Bernardita Dianzon, F.S.P., S.T.D., Ph.D. (A)
 
This course is an introduction into the thought and spirit of Paul through a study of the text, structure and historical background of the proto-Pauline epistles and, where pertinent, of the Acts of the Apostles.
 
Paul (New Testament Letters) 
Fr. Renato Repole, S.J., S.T.D. (B)
 
This course provides an introduction to the letters of St. Paul, both the Proto- and the Deuteropauline. But, first, the students will explore and reflect on the life of St. Paul, especially his vocation to become the Apostle to the Gentiles. Then, second, after an introductory matter on the phenomenon of letter-writing in the first century, the rest of the semester will be devoted to examining his letters or epistles: the circumstances for their writing, the basic outline and the principal themes or issues that are expounded therein. Applying mainly classical rhetorical method, it is hoped that, at the end of the course, the students come to understand Pauline thought deeper and realize its importance in Church life and doctrine.
 
Paul (New Testament Letters) 
Fr. Herbert Schneider, S.J., S.T.D. (C, Online)
 
The course introduces the students to Paul, a first-century Jew from the Diaspora, who gave his allegiance to the Messiah Jesus as evangelist, community builder, pastor, and theologian. The course has two aims: (1) Students are to become acquainted with the Pauline Corpus in the New Testament and this means that they will be required to read the Letters thoroughly, summarizing their observations in overview charts, (2) Realizing that Paul’s theology was always in the service of moving his communities to maturity in faith and Christian life, the focus of study will be on major theological themes rather than work through letter after letter, section after section. In all of this we want to discover Paul’s motivation, his missionary preaching and community-building strategy.
 
Penance, Anointing, Marriage 
Fr. Timoteo Ofrasio, S.J., S.L.D.
 
This course is a study of the Sacraments of Penance, Anointing, and Marriage from the perspective of history, theology, and liturgical celebration.
 
Philippine Church History 
Fr. Antonio de Castro, S.J., S.T.L., E.H.D.
 
The course begins with the evangelization of the Philippines under the Patronato church-state regime and follows the development of the Christian community, to the American colonial regime, and the beginning of full Filipinization.
 
Prophets of Israel 
Sr. Helen Graham, M.M., Ph.D. (A)
 
This course provides a brief overview of the prophetic literature of biblical Israel from the schism to the period of dispersion and restoration, utilizing a combination of historical and canonical approaches to the prophetic text.
 
Prerequisite: Pentateuchal Studies
 
Prophets of Israel 
Fr. Felipe Fruto Ramirez, S.J., S.T.D. (B)
 
This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in the ancient world and early Israel (Samuel, Nathan, Elijah, Elisha); the personality and message of the writing prophets (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Deutero-Isaiah, and others) within their historical contexts. Discussion includes exegesis of selected oracles, one from every prophet. The themes of Davidic kingship, the Deuteronomic theology, Messianism, etc. are also treated.
 
Prerequisite: Pentateuchal Studies
 
Psalms and Wisdom Literature (Psalms of Lament) 
Pastor Federico Villanueva, Ph.D.
 
This is a study of the psalms of lament in terms of their historical background, poetic nature, canonical context, and application to the Asian contexts. Other lament literature outside the Psalms (the book of Lamentations and Confessions of Jeremiah), as well as modern laments, will also be included in the study.
 
Research Methodology in Ministry 
Fr. Albert Alejo, S.J., Ph.D.
 
This course in theological methodology develops a student’s ability to research and analyze a particular ministry context in-depth in preparation for a Doctor of Ministry Dissertation as a contribution to the life and mission of the local church. The course compares the two general academic theological approaches, the primarily research, and the more professional, performative approaches, and focuses on the specific methodologies and appropriate research-related skills linked to students’ professional practice within ministry. The course provides the structures for planning, developing and evaluating research as well as an understanding of research related issues.
 
Scripture, Tradition, Magisterium 
Fr. Hartono Budi, S.J., Th.D. (A, Tutorial)
Fr. Manuel Francisco, S.J., S.T.D. (B)
 
Fundamental Theology endeavors to study the foundational reality of Christianity and theology, which is the revelation of God in Jesus Christ. This revelation seeks a response of faith from the human addressee. This present course, also included in fundamental theology, deals with the transmission of revelation throughout Christian history through Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition, as well as its authoritative proposition and interpretation through the Church’s Magisterium. Hence, the three constitutive parts of this course will be concerned with giving a theological description and dogmatic explanation of, respectively, Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium.
 
Sin and Grace 
Fr. Manuel Francisco, S.J., S.T.D. (A)
Bro. Joaquin Yap, Jr., S.W., D.Phil. (B)
 
Divine grace – which the Catechism of the Catholic Church describes as “a participation in the life of God” (#1997) – can be best appreciated when contrasted with “dis-grace,” that is, sin. Just as light becomes apparent when one has emerged from darkness; just as the good news of salvation becomes truly “wonderful news” when one has recognized salvation’s absence.  As St. Paul puts it: “Where sin increased, grace abounded all the more” (Romans 5:20).
 
This course first discusses the mystery of sin and evil in scripture and in the tradition.  However, more class time will be devoted to grace: the mystery of our “new life in Christ” and the pastoral implications arising from this graced reality.  The course touches on some major controversies such as Pelagianism and Semipelagianism, the questions raised by the Reformers, and the response of Trent.  Special attention is given to the patristic doctrine of deification (theosis).  In attempting a contemporary and contextualized theology of grace, the course considers the question of the presence and action of divine grace in other (especially Asian) religions.
 
Sin and Grace 
Fr. Arnel Aquino, S.J., S.T.D. (C)
 
This course consists of a systematic-doctrinal investigation of the mystery of “life in Christ,” and the pastoral implications and reflections arising from this graced reality. Beginning with the scriptural understanding of grace, the study traces the major controversies in Christian tradition: Pelagianism-Semi Pelagianism-Augustinianism; the Reformation and its heirs – the response of Trent. Special attention will be given to the theological attempt to understand the mysterious relationship between divine grace and human freedom, and to exploring the richness of the patristic doctrine (preserved in the Eastern churches) of divinization (theosis). In attempting to do a contemporary and contextualized theological anthropology, the course will consider the question of the presence and action of grace in other (especially Asian) religions.
 
Sin and Grace 
Fr. Jose Mario Francisco, S.J., S.T.L., Ph.D. (D) and (E, Tutorial)
 
It appears that the presence and effects of sin are more obvious than those of grace. And yet Christianity views the human person and community as more graced than sinful. The course discusses this view in dialogue with social and scientific perspectives on the human (cosmic, genetic, psychological and cultural). The first part begins with the reality of God’s grace as all-embracing (“everything is grace”) and proceeds to specific descriptions of it as “sanctifying nature” (Thomas Aquinas), as deification (Orthodox Christianity), and as “inner freedom” (Martin Luther). The second part examines personal and original sin in relation to the mystery of evil in human life and history.
 
Spanish II 
Fr. Reginaldo Mananzan, S.J., J.C.D.
 
This course is open to those who already have the equivalent knowledge of Spanish I.  It begins with studies of Verbs in their Subjunctive Mood and proceeds with the rest of the verb structures.
 
Special Topics in Marital and Family Counseling: Child and Adolescent Counseling 
Ma. Teresa Villasor, Ph.D.
 
This course will review the different theories of development as they relate to counseling and clinical work with children and adolescents. In the process, the interplay of the biological, social, cognitive, and environmental factors that may cause or influence the severity of the emotional, behavioral, and adjustment problems of children will be explored. Counseling and clinical procedures, treatment methods and counseling approaches and techniques for specific cases such as children of separated parents, adopted children, sibling rivalry, abused and traumatized children, etc. will be the main topics of the course.
 
Structured experiential activities, small group sharing, role playing, reflections on one’s own childhood and adolescent experiences, and lecturettes are some of the learning approaches that will be used in teaching the course.
 
Pre-requisite: Theo 289/Sp89 Pastoral Psychology and Counseling.
Minimum number of students: 10
 
Supervised Retreat-Giving Experience 
Fr. Victor Baltazar, S.J., S.T.L.
This Module 3 provides occasions for supervised retreat-giving experiences, focusing on a practicum experience for individually-directed retreats. Participants are guided through a review and deepening of the learning of Module 2 and then initiated into directing 1–3 retreatants making 4-day individually-directed retreats, while receiving one-on-one supervision with our Center staff or associates. After the practicum, participants gather together for appropriation sessions on retreat-giving. Only those who satisfactorily completed Module 2 qualify for this third module.
 
Pre-requisites: Foundations for Directed Retreat and Fundamentals of Directed Retreat-Giving.
Course requirements: reflection papers, book reports, and others, to be assigned at the discretion of the Director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality.
 
The Resurrection of Jesus Christ: Theology of Hope 
Fr. Hartono Budi, S.J., Th.D.
 
What do Christians have to say about hope? What is the ultimate of Christian hope? What hope is there for change, transformation, new possibilities within the world of today marked by various forms of marginalization and untimely death? While aiming at the intelligible answers primarily based on the Scripture and best Christian traditions, this course opens students up to a disposition of listening to, and discerning, different cultural views and wisdom (Asian stories and beyond) on “hope” (as well as on hopelessness) and its possible empowering elements. Then, what are we going to do about it in the meantime? What are the liberating and practical ways in which hope can come alive for communities as well as individual with an increasing awareness of the present “culture of ambiguity” and the fragility of our natural and social environments? Readings from biblical scholars, reflections from liberation theologians and on one’s own experience in depth will be the main sources of information and discussion.
 
Women in Scriptures 
Sr. Ma. Anicia Co, R.V.M., S.T.D., Ph.D.
 
The course studies biblical texts that concern women. It begins with a survey of women and images of women in Scriptures and then discusses currents of interpretations that influence contemporary views of women in the Church and society. It analyzes the characterization of women and men in biblical narratives, laws, poetry and prophetic texts to discover and highlight the different images of women in Jewish Scriptures and in the New Testament. The socio-historical contexts of these texts are discussed to understand the biblical portrayal of women. New exegetical methods and approaches are explored in the study of selected passages to move towards an ethically responsible interpretation that has a bearing on issues of women’s role in the Church and the partnership of women and men in the mission of the Church. Special attention is given to the gospel stories of Jesus’ encounters with women, the place of women in Jesus’ community of disciples, Mary as model of discipleship.