A Jesuit, Filipino, and Asian Ecclesiastical Faculty of Theology

Friday, March 24, 2017
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Upon admission to the licentiate program the student must choose his/her area of concentration from any of the following:
 
a) Biblical Theology
b) Systematic-Dogmatic Theology
c) Moral Theology
d) Spirituality and Pastoral Counseling
e) Spirituality and Leadership (see program description below)
f)  Migration Theology (see program description below)
 
General STL Guidelines
 
Academic Prerequisites
 
To get accepted to this program the applicants must have the ecclesiastical degree Baccalaureate in Sacred Theology (STB) with at least a general average of 2.0 (B+). Those who finished four years of theology from a seminary that does not offer the STB may also qualify for the STL program provided they have good grades (at least a general average of 2.0 or B+) and they can offer some proof (e.g., a research paper they have written in their seminary course, etc.) of their capacity to write a tesina.
 
Applicants must pass an Entrance Exam administered by the Ateneo de Manila and an LST English Proficiency Test. They are admitted to the STL program upon the recommendation of the Standards & Degrees Committee and the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
 
STL Language Requirements
 
The STL program requires a working knowledge of one modern language, besides English, in which significant theological writing has been done (e.g., German, French, or Spanish), one Biblical language (Hebrew or Greek), and Ecclesiastical Latin. The requirements may be satisfied either by [a] taking language courses of two semesters each language in any university/college, provided that at least a grade of B is attained; or by [b] passing a proficiency test administered by LST in any or all of these languages. The test, lasting for 30 minutes, consists in translation of a page of Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Greek, Ecclesiastical Latin, German, French, or Spanish, with the aid of a dictionary. The language requirements must be fulfilled before writing the tesina.
 
STL Course Work
 
The program requires at least three semesters of course work in which the student must successfully complete eleven (11) licentiate or doctoral level courses – a total of 33 credit units.
 
a) Concentration (21 units): Seven courses or seminars are drawn from the student's field of concentration.
 
Reading Courses: Two of the seven concentration courses must be reading courses specifically geared toward the topic of the student's tesina . At the end of each reading course, the student must submit a written report in the form of a Review of Literature, i.e., a survey and evaluation of books and articles dealing with a specific research topic. The review must cover all the books and articles assigned by the professor as well as other readings that the student may have discovered for himself/herself in the course of the research. The reading course includes pre-arranged meetings with the professor to discuss the reading materials.
 
Note: Before enrolling in the reading courses, they must first be approved by the Director of Advanced Graduate Students or the Vice President for Academic Affairs. A clear distinction should be made between reading courses and tutorial courses . Reading courses are tailor-made to suit the specific topic of the student's tesina. Tutorial courses may also involve reading assignments on a course bibliography, but the readings may not necessarily deal with the topic of the student's tesina .
 
b) Electives (12 units): Four courses are electives chosen from outside the field of concentration.
 
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STL Comprehensive Examination
 
After successfully completing the STL course work the student must pass an oral comprehensive exa­mination. With the help of a professor, the student prepares four (4) to six (6) general thesis statements from courses in his/her field of concentration, each thesis supported by a short, pertinent bibliography. When his/her theses have been judged to be satisfactory by the professor, these are submitted to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for his approval. The thesis statements are then submitted to the examiners, and the student is given at least one month to prepare for the examination. On a date set by the school the student takes the oral examination before a panel of three professors, one of whom is the mentor. Each professor is given 15 minutes to examine the candidate. In case of failure, only one retake is allowed. A second failure automatically disqualifies the student from the program.
 
STL Tesina
 
The STL program requires the writing and successfully defending a tesina . Students who are ready to begin work on the tesina must register for Thesis Direction and obtain from the Loyola School of Theology Office a copy of the guidelines for writing a tesina .
 
a ) Nature of the STL Tesina: The tesina grows out of the work of the seminars and reading courses and presents the principal work of the program. It is not necessary that the tesina make an original contribution to theology. However, on the level of method, it should show a sound grasp of theological method, rigorous application, and precision of expression – in short, an aptitude for scientific theological research. It should have the quality of a research article in a scientific theological publication. 
 
A pastoral ministry project which responds to a pastoral need or problem, as long as it exhibits a grasp of theological method, can also fulfill the requirements of the STL tesina.
 
The tesina is prepared under the direction of a mentor appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
 
b) STL Tesina Proposal Defense: Under the guidance of the mentor appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the student writes a tesina proposal. The proposal, which can serve as the first chapter of the tesina , should present and discuss the following: [1] The Problem of the Tesina ; [2] Scope and Limitations; [3] The Significance of the Problem; [4] Methodology; [5] Definition of Key Terms; and [6] Basic Bibliography.
 
The proposal (excluding bibliography) should normally not exceed 10 pages and should follow the LST Style Manual (based on Turabian, 6 th edition). Once approved by the mentor, five (5) copies of the tesina proposal are submitted to the Vice President for Academic Affairs who appoints a panel of two professors plus the mentor to examine the proposal. On a date specified by the school the student defends his proposal orally before the panel.
 
The defense consists in [1] a clear presentation (for about 15 minutes) of the written proposal by the writer, covering the tesina's basic problem or theme, its scope and limitation, its importance, and the basic sources (bibliography) and methods to be used; [2] each professor reviews the proposal with the writer through questions, suggestions, etc., usually for a period of 10 to 15 minutes, depending upon the particular needs of the proposal. The professors may offer brief written recommendations, analyses, suggestions, etc. to the writer, copies of which are also given to the mentor and the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
 
c) STL Tesina Writing: After the proposal has been approved by the panel, the student may now proceed to writing the tesina chapter by chapter. All throughout the writing of the thesis the student must seek the guidance of his/her mentor. Each chapter must be approved by the mentor one at a time. The STL tesina should be between 80 to 150 pages in length (excluding Bibliography).
 
d) STL Tesina Public Defense: After the mentor has formally certified the tesina ready for public defense, a second reader is assigned by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Ideally, the second reader is chosen from among the panel of the tesina proposal defense.
 
It is the task of the second reader to ascertain that the tesina is ready for defense. He/she has the right to order any changes in the tesina he/she considers necessary for it to be truly ready for defense. He/she has the right to declare the tesina not ready for defense and send it back to the student and mentor for further work.
 
No tesina can be submitted to the other examiners and be scheduled for defense before the second reader has approved it. In case of an unsolvable conflict between the second reader and mentor, an independent panel appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs will decide the issue.
 
After the second reader declares the tesina ready for defense and after all his/her suggested corrections or changes have been made, the tesina will be submitted to the other readers that, together with the second reader, shall make up the panel of examiners. A date for the defense is then scheduled.
 
For a tesina of ordinary length, four weeks must be allowed for the second reader to finish his task of reviewing the tesina. An additional two weeks needs to be allowed for the other reader to prepare for the defense of the tesina . The tesina mentor will be the third member of the panel of examiners. (Note the cut off date for defense in the academic calendar of the school for each semester)
 
Final Grade
 
The final grade for the STL program is computed in the following way: forty percent for course work, thirty percent for the tesina, and thirty percent for the final comprehensive examination.
 
 
Specific Program Guidelines
 
STL in Migration Theology
 
Migration is a growing phenomenon in Asia, and all indications suggest that it will remain an important aspect of the region’s landscape. The local churches in countries of origin and destination in Asia are called to promote theological reflection and studies on this phenomenon.
 
The Instruction Erga Migrantes Caritas Christi states: "Episcopal Conferences will likewise entrust to Catholic university faculties in their territories the task of studying the various aspects of migration more thoroughly for the benefit of concrete pastoral service for migrants. Compulsory courses of theological specialization could also be programmed for this purpose" (EMCC, 71).
 
To answer this call, Loyola School of Theology, the Episcopal Commission for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant Peoples (CBCP-EMCI), and the Scalabrini Migration Center (SMC) have established a special program in Migration Theology. The program is tailored to meet the different needs of lay pastoral workers, religious, and ordained persons involved in this ministry. It also aims to train students of theology in addressing this important concern of the Church today.
 
Course Work
 
The program requires at least three semesters of course work in which the student must successfully complete seven courses on migration (21 units), two of which must be reading courses. Four other courses (12 units) on migration are taken by the student from a list of available migration electives to complete his or her studies. With the permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the student may take other courses closely related to the study of migration.
 
Specialization
 
Theo 322.2   The Bible and People of God on the Move
Theo 345.4   Introducing Theologies of Migration
Theo 366.5   Pastoral Counseling for Migrants
Theo 371.1   Management of Pastoral Programs in Migration    
Theo 389.2   Justice and Migration      
Theo 389.3   Human Rights of Migrants   
Theo 389.4   Migration in Catholic Social Teaching   
Theo             Other courses related to migration
 
Electives

Four other courses (12 units) from the various branches of theology are taken as electives by the student from a list of available spirituality courses at Loyola School of Theology. With the permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, other courses may be taken as electives.
 
Description of Courses in the Field of Specialization

Theo 322.2  The Bible and People of God on the Move
 
The course explores some of the Scripture texts in which God’s people are presented as descendants of outsiders. In the New Testament, Jesus comes as a “foreigner” and offers a new perspective to discover in every encounter with the migrant something unique of God’s experience and to appreciate hospitality to the stranger as the pastoral challenge of our time.
 
Theo 345.4 Introducing Theologies of Migration
 
The course focuses on methodological approaches in doing a theology of migration. It begins with anthropological-sociological perspectives to understanding the migrants’ experiences, and then deals with samples of attempts at doing systematic theologies from the migrants’ contexts. Students will participate in the construction of theologies for and with the migrants.

Theo 366.5  Pastoral Counseling for Migrants

This is a course on the psycho-social interventions and pastoral care of migrant workers and their families. The targeted population is sorted out together with their all important issues for well-being, even as they are physically and emotionally separated from their own family members. The available interventions are critiqued, and the class explores other possible and effective service and care of them, both in their country of origin and job destinations.  Derivation for personal strategies and plans of assistance in psychological, social and spiritual fields are derived and evaluated at the end of the course.

Theo 371.1  Management of Pastoral Programs in Migration

The course trains students in skills in pastoral planning, implementation and evaluation of programs with migrants and the families left behind. These programs include, though not exclusively, migration programs organized and implemented in the parish setting. The course includes as well training for advocacy and networking on migrants’ issues. The course will also offer possibilities of exposure to organizations and parishes involved in the migrant ministry.

Theo 389.2  Justice and Migration
 
The purpose of this course is to examine some of the ethical questions which arise from migration and to see what contribution the Christian social ethics tradition offers to migration management. In particular, the category of justice will be utilized as a promising development in social ethics. The course will focus, among others, on the perennial tension between the prerogative of the State to manage migration and the aspiration to migrate as an expression of the right to a more humane life. This tension is studied in the light of international law and the position of some ethical traditions. The development in the concept of justice, in particular distributive justice, is then considered, as well as the contribution of the concept of justice in the Christian tradition, to offer some elements for a more humane management of migration.
 
Theo 389.3  Human Rights of Migrants
 
The first part of the course examines the origin and development of human rights; it discusses its ethical foundation and examines some controversial aspects in the human rights discourse. It also presents the Church’s teaching on human rights. The second part is dedicated to the rights of migrants, in particular, to the analysis of the Migrant Workers Convention.
 
Theo 389.4 Migration in Catholic Social Teaching
 
The first part of the course traces the historical development of the teaching of the Church on the pastoral care of migrants, with particular attention to the major documents issued by the Popes and the Roman Curia. The second part will focus on the teaching of the Churches in Asia and on some thematic aspects.
 
 
STL in Spirituality and Leadership
 
The program is designed to effect transformational change in the pastoral leaders’ perspective and behavior as they learn new insights on the theology, spirituality, theory and practice of pastoral leadership as well as practical management skills geared towards a more effective  and efficient service in their communities.

The various courses combine knowledge of theories, theological-spiritual reflections and experiential approaches to ensure integral formation of the participants. The program also highlights the nature, facets and processes of the disciplines of leadership and management and their necessary convergence to help pastoral leaders achieve their goals.
 
This new program is a joint endeavor of LST and East Asian Pastoral Institute (EAPI). Students admitted to this STL program also participate in EAPI's Pastoral Leadership and Management for Mission Program (PLMM) as residential (live-in) students from January to June.
 
Yearly, the EAPI houses around seventy men and women from different parts of the world – laity, religious and clergy – who live together as an international community, and take time to be in the programs that suit their specific needs for personal renewal, a “spiritual pause and review of life”, growth and greater effectiveness in their ministries as pastoral ministers and leaders of communities.

Students enrolled in this program may apply for partial scholarships the terms of which can be arranged with Fr. Arthur Leger, S.J., Director of EAPI, through the following contact information: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; tel. no. (+ 632) 426-5901 to 03.
 
LST-EAPI also currently offers a civil degree Master of Arts major in Pastoral Ministry with a field of specialization in Pastoral Management. Click here for more information.

Course Work
 
Specialization

The program requires around three semesters of course work in which the student must successfully complete seven (7) three-unit courses on spirituality and leadership (21 units). These courses are offered by EAPI in its Pastoral Leadership and Management for Mission Program (PLMM) and by Loyola School of Theology:

Theo 375     Leadership: A Pastoral Approach
Theo 375.1  Leadership in Context
Theo 375.2  Leadership Ethics for Pastoral Care
Theo 375.3  Leadership for Mission
Theo 375.4  Management: A Pastoral Approach
Theo 375.5  Management Skills for Pastoral Leaders
Theo 391     Apostolic Spirituality or Theo 393 Discernment and Spiritual Direction

Electives

Four other courses (12 units) are taken as electives by the student from a list of available spirituality courses at Loyola School of Theology. With the permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, other courses may be taken as electives.

Languages

The STL program requires a working knowledge of three languages: at least one modern language, besides English, i.e., German, Italian, French, or Spanish; and at least 1 ancient language, i.e., Latin, Hebrew or Greek. The requirements may be satisfied either by [a] taking language courses of two semesters each language in any university/college, provided that at least a grade of B is attained; or by [b] passing a proficiency test administered by LST in any or all of these languages.

Description of Courses in the Field of Specialization

Theo 375 Leadership: A Pastoral Approach

Modules: Shepherd-Leadership, Self-Leadership for Relationships, Authority and Power for Pastoral Care, Creating a Sanctuary for Transformation

This course provides the participants with an understanding of the distinctiveness and plurality of pastoral leadership and followership and test these understandings against their own experiences within the local cultural context.   

Theo 375.1 Leadership in Context

Modules: Vatican II: A New Understanding of Leadership, Doing Social Analysis with Social Teaching of the Church, Cross-Cultural Leadership for A Global Church, SHE Leadership in a Male Context

This course provides the participants with insights on how the study of the context determines one’s leadership style and help discern which approach to leadership is necessary for transformation and conversion at a particular time in history.
   
Theo 375.2 Leadership Ethics for Pastoral Care

Modules: Virtue Ethics for Leadership in a Multi-Cultural  Communities, Formation of A Caring Character, The Development of an Authentic Leader, Moral Standards for Church Leaders

This course provides the participants with ethical principles that would enable them to make compassionate decisions and take moral actions that can be considered as good and right in their cultures.    

Theo 375.3 Leadership for Mission

Modules: Religious Leadership Today, Participatory Leadership in a Hierarchical Church, Reclaiming Jesus’ Mission in Asia/Pacific, Leading Spirituality in Secular World

This course provides the participants with a contemporary understanding of mission and church and how these should influence pastoral leaders’ attitudes, skills, and knowledge.   
   
Theo 375.4 Management: A Pastoral Approach

Modules: Mystery and Mission, Spirituality and Structures, Money and Ministry, Conflicts and Human Resources

This course provides the participants with present ecclesial paradoxes, theological foundations, organizational principles, and pastoral skills to enable them to effectively manage their ministries.

Theo 375.5 Management Skills for Pastoral Leaders

Modules: Evaluating the Ecclesial Community, Pastoral Plans through Participation, Writing a Project Proposal, Handling Paradoxes With Joy

This course provides the participants with skills and best practices from the secular world to equip them to respond to new tensions related to leadership and management of resources.
   
Theo 391 Apostolic Spirituality    

This course offers a theological exploration of apostolic spirituality in terms of its three-fold dynamic as conversion, commitment and communion. The apostolic orientation of each dynamic is considered from its biblical foundations, subsequent historical developments and its various anthropological, Christological, ecclesiological, sacramental and eschatological aspects. Since apostolic spirituality seeks to encounter God who labors in every person and in everything, the course concludes with a strategy of discernment to help persons grow as a contemplative in action today.
   
Theo 393 Discernment and Spiritual Direction

The course is a study of Ignatian discernment in the context of spiritual and retreat direction. It begins by clarifying the meaning of discernment and traces the development of the idea and practice of discernment in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. The course then studies the rules of Ignatian discernment as presented in Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises and considers their applicability to concrete decision making situations (viz., vocation discernment, communal discernment). The course then concludes with a discussion of the process of maturing in both prayer and discernment.