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Available Courses

  • The course introduces the students to Paul and his letters.
  • Theo 225 B: Synoptics introduces students to the first three Gospels. It holds that the Gospel of Mark was the earliest Gospel and treats Matthew and Luke as the earliest "commentaries" on Mark attempting to adapt Mark to the changed situation and changed needs of their communities.
  • Theo 225C Synoptics online introduces students to the first three Gospels. It holds that the Gospel of Mark was the earliest Gospel and treats Matthew and Luke as the earliest "commentaries" on Mark attempting to adapt Mark to the changed situation and changed needs of their communities. The course of for those students who want to work on their own and who have mastered the discipline of good time management.
  • An introductory course to the language of the Old Testament. It covers chapters 1-23 of Thomas O. Lambdin’s Introduction to Biblical Hebrew, which deal with the alphabet, nouns, adjectives, prepositions, articles, pronominal suffixes, construct chains, and the QAL forms of the verbs.
  • The course focuses on the origin and formation of the Old Testament books as well as the history of Israel including geography and culture of the Ancient Near East.
  • This deals with the history of Pentateuchal research; the themes that bind the Pentateuch together; and the Levitical and Deuteronomic theologies of those who have written, compiled and edited the Pentateuch. This course includes the exegesis and rhetorical analysis of some key passages in the Pentateuch.

  • The course introduces students to the Fourth Gospel.




  • The value of ourselves and our world lies in that all are created, redeemed and destined by the Triune God in Jesus Christ. This theological reality does not diminish but enhances the characteristics and processes of the natural world as well as the relative autonomy of human freedom and history. Evil then, whether natural, moral or structural, is not a threat to this origin and destiny, but an indication of our need for transformation in Christ. The course draws from Scripture and Church documents as well as from cultural and scientific resources.
  • Canon Law II builds up on the foundations laid out in the initial canon law course. It orients the students into the various ways and means whereby the whole People of God – the laity, clerics and consecrated persons - exercises Christ’s triple office of governing, teaching and sanctifying in today’s actual ecclesial life. The books of the Code of 1983 to be studied are sections of Book I on General Norms, Book III on the Teaching Office of the Church (Ministry of the Word, Missionary Activity, Catholic Education, Social Communications), Book IV on the Sanctifying Office of the Church (Sacraments, Other Acts of Worship, Sacred Times and Places), Book V on Temporal Goods, Book VI on Sanctions (Offenses and Penalties) and some sections of Book VII on Processes (Trials, Matrimonial Processes).


  • This initial course in canon law is developed around four key questions: (1) In what sense is the Code of Canon Law of 1983 the final document of the Second Vatican Council? (2) Who make up the Church, the People of God? What are their prerogatives and obligations? (3) How is the People of God organized in order to serve its purpose? (4) How does the Church exercise today Christ’s triple office of governing, teaching and sanctifying?

     

    Part I of the course provides a basic introduction to the theology and history of canon law, with special focus on the new ecclesiological developments at Vatican II which guided the revision of the old Code of 1917.

     

    Part II looks into the communion of the Church as composed of the laity, clerics and consecrated persons, having their own unique charisms and ministries that build up the one Body of Christ.

     

    Part III studies the organization of the People of God on the level of the local, particular and universal Church.

     

    In Part IV, the course begins to study the Church’s triple office of governing, teaching and sanctifying, the treatment of which will be continued in the succeeding course, Canon Law II.

  • The course focuses on the development of the Church's Social Teaching from Rerum Novarum to Centesimus Annus.
  • This course helps students develop the skills needed for academic writing.

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